Sunday, August 27, 2006

The Lost Sons


I picked this up from a Robert Farrar Capon page in respect to the Prodigal Son, the insight into forgiveness is excellent...



The fascinating thing also is that when the father embraces the boy who has come home from wasting his life, the boy never gets his confession out of his mouth until after the kiss, until after the embrace. What this says to you and me who have to live with the business of trying to confess our sins is that confession is not a pre-condition of forgiveness. It’s something that you do after you know you have been forgiven. Confession is not something you do in order to get forgiveness. It’s something you do in order to celebrate the forgiveness you got for nothing. Nobody can earn forgiveness. The Prodigal knows he's a dead son. He can't come home as a son, and yet in his father's arms he rises from the dead and then he is able to come to his father's side.

4 comments:

annette said...

perhaps i've been staring at a computer screen for too long but I read that title as the lost scones! (either that or I'm feeling hungry!)

Dave said...

Go get some food annette, the story of a scone that wasted all its inheritance just fails to have the same impact.

Rock in the Grass said...

I live in a country that instituted a Truth and Reconciliation Commission: the idea being that if a person was willing to tell the truth about her/his participation in the Apartheid system, then that person would be granted amnesty from prosecution. This is obviously grace granted as a result of confession. And it worked to some extent. But many people have kept their heads down and hoped that thye overload of our criminal justice system would make it all go away. This past weekend Mr Adriaan Vlok (a key fugure in torture of political activists and who has tried to avoid most of the consequences of his actions), visited one of those people he tortured and personally asked forgiveness. This was not prompted by the lure of amnesty, but rather by an ancounter with God's grace. The weekend papers reported this as a "bizarre act of penance". I suppose bizarre because there was no incentive! Go figure.

Dave said...

Rock, weird that it is reported as a 'bizzare' act, in the words of Willy Wonka (Gene Wilder) when faced with Charlies honesty in returning the everlasting gobstopper...

So shines a good deed in a
weary world

 

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